My Dog Ate Viagra

When you have pets at home, you need to be very careful of everything you handle or keep in the house or the entire compound since they are likely to lick or bite anything they come across. Dogs, for example, have the habit of eating whatever they find. This might be very harmful since some of the things they eat may contain harmful substances. Among the things that dogs may come across when carelessly handled are drugs.

Now, while drugs are meant to treat, they can turn out to be harmful at times, not only to human beings but also to your pets. Viagra, for instance, is a drug that is presently common in many households. Its primary function is to help human males who have erectile dysfunction. It also has validating properties, which help loosen and open up the veins, hence increasing blood flow. Sadly, people’s increased usage leads to high chances of pets, especially dogs, mistakenly coming across them and eating them.

What Does Viagra Do to Your Dog?

Viagra contains Sildenafil, a substance that helps humans with erectile dysfunction, and is used in your dog when he has pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary hypertension refers to when blood pressure is abnormally high in the arteries of the lungs, forcing the heart’s right side to function harder than it is supposed to. Now, this is where Sildenafil comes in. It enhances the relaxation of the smooth muscles surrounding the small blood vessels in the lungs, thereby reducing the heart’s workload.

How Do You Administer the Medication?

It is always a good practice to give your dog the medication just as prescribed by the veterinarian. The standard dose recommended is always between 0.5 to 3mg per kilo of the dog’s body weight. It’s also administered every 8 to 12 hours. If by any chance you miss giving your dog a dose of the drug at a particular time, it is advised that you administer the next dose the moment you remember. Alternatively, if the next dose is close, go back to the regular timetable. Never at any time should you double dose.

Besides Sildenafil, there are other medications that you can use to treat pulmonary hypertension in dogs. However, you realize that its affordability is the reason behind its wide usage for the treatment.

What Are the Side Effects of Viagra to Your Dog?

When you give your dog too much Sildenafil, he can suffer from its severe effects. Below are some of the possible side effects;

Vomiting

Too much of this substance will make your dog vomit, and this may even be a relief for him.

Weakness

Just like human beings, your dog will begin to show this sign when he takes an overdose of Viagra. You will notice that he cannot stand by himself or keeps falling whenever he tries to stand.

Skin Flushing

Skin flushing is when the skin turns color and begins to redden. This is also a sign that he is reacting to the drug overdose.

Tachycardia

Tachycardia refers to an increased heart rate. You will also notice this in your dog almost immediately after he has eaten the Viagra tablets.

Diarrhea

This is also a common side effect that shows that your dog has had an overdose.

How Can You Treat Viagra Overdose in Your Dog?

When you overdose your dog with Viagra, get in touch with your veterinarian as soon as possible. Now, some of the things your vet will want to know immediately are when your dog ate the Viagra, the number of pills he ate, and the actual dose he is supposed to take. He will also want to determine how much of the medication your dog had taken and how long ago he took the Viagra. If he notices that your dog ate the pills not long ago, he will first induce vomiting in him to get them out of his system. However, he may decide to have your dog hospitalized if he notices that your dog ate the pills some hours before.

If hospitalized, the vet may consider giving your dog IV fluids, and his cardiovascular function checked from time to time to monitor his heart rate and blood pressure.

Conclusion

All said and done, there’s no cause for alarm when your dog eats Viagra. As discussed above, he can be treated. Just remember that it’s essential to keep all drugs out of reach of children and out of reach of your pets. Something else to note is that when you take your pet to the vet for treatment due to an overdose, ensure you carry the prescription container/box with you.